Previous Message
Next Message

[css-d] Need help!

Sent by Judy Giraffeweb on 25 January 2002 17:05


My CSS is very basic I believe.  However, I am trying to re-work a site and
I have 2 problems.

1.  When I validate, the CSS validates but I have a Warning with nothing
listed under it.
http://www.schneidertree.com/test/

2. On other pages, if the info on the right side of the Table is shorter
than the left, it all moves down to the bottom of the page.
http://www.schneidertree.com/test/emergency.html

I was thinking about experimenting with ditching the tables altogether and
trying the 2 column layout on Eric's site, but I am so crunched for time now
that I may have to try that later.

Any suggestions about what could be wrong?  OR other ideas?  The orginal
site is at http://www.schneidertree.com. I don't know who did it originally.

Judy Benedict
Giraffe Web Design Services
"Heads Above The Rest"
1 Augusta St., Suite 304
Greenville, SC  29601
864-420-0169

----- Original Message -----
From: "Ben Henick" [EMAIL-REMOVED]>
To: [EMAIL-REMOVED]>
Sent: Friday, January 25, 2002 4:12 PM
Subject: Re: [css-d] What happened to design?


> On Fri, 25 Jan 2002, Joshua Kaufman wrote:
>
> > Has anyone else read Chris Casciano's article on the cookie cutter
> > approach that many are taking to CSS?
> > http://www.chunkysoup.net/opinion/boringcss/
> >
> > He argues that even though major browsers have become more standards..
> >
> > Is anyone else using CSS like this?  Will strong use of CSS bring
> > about...
>
> The reasons for this are manifold, I think.
>
> 1.  Netscape 4.
>
> 2.  Dreamweaver et. al.
>
> 3.  Designers by and large have yet to grasp the fact that markup was
>     always meant for structural purposes, and are clinging to their
>     comfort zones (see #2).
>
> That said, what can CSS really do, that's amazing?  (I asked a similar
> question at WebVisions, and it tanked horribly - nobody understood what I
> was getting at.)
>
> CSS /by itself/ is... well, interesting.  But in terms of neat stuff, most
> of its power as a single tool is in control of type.  CSS2 allows
> presentation and structure to cooperate more broadly, but we all know
> about the current state of CSS2 support.
>
> Once you get past that, there's not much... unless you start doing DHTML
> (which without CSS is a lot less valuable).
>
> For many of the roles DHTML can fill, Flash already does the job quite
> well, from the designer's perspective.
>
> Which starts simmerin' a whole diff'nt kettle o'fish.
>
> Keep in mind though that I'm not dissin' on DHTML (note my earlier post).
> At the same time, it's the designer's role to create something that makes
> people gasp in awe - and designers capable of inspiring such awe are more
> likely to do their work in Flash.
>
>
> --
> Ben Henick
> Web Author At-Large              Managing Editor
> http://www.io.com/persist1/      http://www.digital-web.com/
> [EMAIL-REMOVED]                  [EMAIL-REMOVED]
> --
> "Are you pondering what I'm pondering, Pinky?"
> "I think so, Brain, but... (snort) no, no, it's too stupid."
> "We will disguise ourselves as a cow."
> "Oh!" (giggles) "That was it exactly!"
>
> _______________________________________________
> css-discuss mailing list
> [EMAIL-REMOVED]
> http://two.pairlist.net/mailman/listinfo/css-discuss
>
>
Previous Message
Next Message

Message thread: